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1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 7: Of God's Covenant - Commentary

...
  • ^ Denault, Baptist Covenant Theology. p. 63 [footnotes references removed].
  • ^ Ibid. pp. 64-67 [footnote references removed].
  • a, b ESV Study Bible. (Crossway, 2008). Taken from the Online Version at www.esvbible.org
  • ^ John M. Frame. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Christian Belief. (Phillipsburg, NJ: P&R Publishing, 2014). p. 68, footnote references removed.
  • ^ Coxe, From Adam to Christ. p. 67.
  • a, b, c, d John Gill. Exposition of the Entire Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ Renihan, Mystery of Christ. p. 83.
  • ^ Coxe, From Adam to Christ. p. 111.
  • ^ Pink, Divine Covenants. p. 96.
  • ^ Coxe, From Adam To Christ. p. 135.
  • ^ Benjamin Keach. Gold Refin’d, or, Baptism in its Primitive Purity. Edited by Simon Wartanian. (London, 1689). p. 75.
  • ^ Coxe, From Adam To Christ. p. 116.
  • ^ Jeffrey D. Johnson, “The Fatal Flaw of Infant Baptism: The Dichotomous Nature of the Abrahamic Covenant” in Recovering A Covenantal Heritage. p. 226.
  • ^ ibid., pp. 237-238.
  • ^ Pink, Divine Covenants. pp. 82-83.
  • ^ ibid., p. 83.
  • ^ Denault, Baptist Covenant Theology. p. 116.
  • ^ Coxe, From Adam To Christ. pp. 72-73.
  • ^ ibid., pp. 90-91.
  • ^ Pink, Divine Covenants. p. 100.
  • ^ ibid., p. 110.
  • ^ I have, by reading Jeffrey Johnson’s works, the Fatal Flaw and the Kingdom of God, changed my position concerning whether the Mosaic offered eternal life or not. When writing the article at first I did not believe that it offered eternal life and used Lev. 18:5 for this point, but now I argue also using Lev. 18:5 that the Mosaic did offer eternal life, but no one was able to obtain it, except Christ the Lord. I’m not completely certain on this point, and could change.
  • ^ Thomas E. Hicks, Jr., “John Owen on the Mosaic Covenant” in Recovering A Covenantal Heritage. p. 185.
  • ^ Van Dorn, Covenant Theology. pp. 99-100.
  • ^ Pink, Divine Covenants. p. 107.
  • ^ ibid., p. 109.
  • ^ Owen, An Exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews. Hebrews 8:6, but it can also be found in the Coxe/Owen volume pp. 187-188.
  • ^ ibid., but it can also be found in the Coxe/Owen volume, pp. 197-198.
  • ^ Pink, Divine Covenants. p. 161.
  • ^ Johnson, “The Fatal Flaw of Infant Baptism: The Dichotomous Nature of the Abrahamic Covenant”. p. 232.
  • ^ Pink, Divine Covenants. p. 175.
  • a, b Owen. An Exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. But it can also be found in the Coxe/Owen volume pp. 172-174.
  • ^ Denault, Baptist Covenant Theology. p. 71.
  • ^ ibid, p. 72.
  • ^ Owen. An Exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews. In loc. But it could also be found on pp. 178-179 of the Coxe/Owen volume.
  • ^ Renihan, Mystery of Christ. p. 150.
  • ^ ibid., pp. 171-173.
  • ^ Keach, Gold. p. 76.
  • ...

    1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 14: Of Saving Faith - Commentary

    ...um (Gen. 3:15); Noah being warned about the Flood and the building of the ark; the promises to Abraham. The ground of these promises or warnings was God Himself and His truthfulness. There was no way for Noah to know that a global flood would come. For Abraham, it was against nature to believe that he could be a father at the age of 99, but he believed because of God’s authority. Paul teaches that our faith rests upon the resurrection of Christ (1 Cor. 15:12-17). We were not there when Christ was raised, but we believe God’s testimony about His Risen Son. Our faith rests upon the testimony and truth of God as revealed to us in His Word and by His Spirit.

    From the various Systematic Theology texts which I own, Hodge was the only one to spend considerable time about the ground of faith, therefore, another quote is in order to glean and learn from his wisdom:

    When, therefore, a Christian is asked, Why he believes the Scriptures and the doctrines therein contained, his simple answer is, On the testimony or authority of God. How else could he know that the worlds were created by God, that our race apostatized from God, that He sent his Son for our redemption, that faith in Him will secure salvation. Faith in such truths can have no other foundation than the testimony of God. If asked, How God testifies to the truth of the Bible? If an educated man whose attention has been called to the subject, he will answer, In every conceivable way: by signs, wonders, and miracles; by the exhibition which the Bible makes of divine knowledge, excellence, authority, and power. If an uneducated man, he may simply say, “Whereas I was blind, now I see.” Such a man, and indeed every true Christian, passes from a state of unbelief to one of saving faith, not by any process of research or argument, but of inward experience. The change may, and often does, take place in a moment. The faith of a Christian in the Bible is, as before remarked, analogous to that which all men have in the moral law, which they recognize not only as truth, but as having the authority of God. What the natural man perceives with regard to the moral law the renewed man is enabled to perceive in regard to “the things of the Spirit,” by the testimony of that Spirit with and by the truth to his heart.[41]

    The Blessings of Faith

    Scripture is filled with statements as to the fruits of faith. The Confession explicitly mentions a few: “justification, sanctification, and eternal life, by virtue of the covenant of grace.” The following blessings of the covenant are said to come by or through faith:

    Justification: Justification is by faith through grace (e.g. Eph. 2:8-9; Rom. 3:22, 28; 5:1; Gal. 2:16). Faith is not the reason for justification. Neither is it the ground. The only reason and ground of justification is the active and passive obedience of Christ. Faith merely receives Christ Who has done everything for our justification. See chapter 11.

    Sanctification: We are not justified by faith and then left to be sanctified by works. Christians are described as “those who are sanctified by faith in me” (Acts 26:18). Galatians 5:6 says that faith works through love, which is a growing fruit of holiness. See chapter 13.

    Eternal life: The most popular verse of the Bible declares: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life” (John 3:16, 36; 6:40, 54, 68; 10:27-28). This eternal life is not only endless lif...


    1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 13: Of Sanctification - Commentary

    ...mes Strong. Cyclopedia of Biblical, Theological and Ecclesiastical Literature. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. “Sanctification”
  • ^ Mounce, Dictionary. p. 1071, entry 39.
  • ^ Louis Berkhof. Systematic Theology. (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Banner of Truth Trust. 1963). p. 527.
  • a, b Mounce, Dictionary. p. 338.
  • a, b Berkhof, Systematic Theology. p. 528.
  • ^ Ibid., pp. 528-529.
  • ^ Ibid., p. 532.
  • ^ Wayne Grudem. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994). Chapter 38, p. 746.
  • ^ Berkhof, Systematic Theology. p. 532.
  • a, b, c John Calvin. Commentaries. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h Albert Barnes’ Notes on the Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ Joseph Benson. Commentary on the Old and New Testaments. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • a, b, c Jamieson, Fausset, Brown. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible (Abridged). Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • a, b The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Edited by J. J. S. Perowne. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ James P. Boyce. Abstract of Systematic Theology. (Hanford, CA: Den Dulk Christian Foundation. 2000, originally 1887). p. 411. Also found online here
  • ^ John M. Frame. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Christian Belief. (Phillipsburg, NJ: P&R Publishing, 2014). p. 986.
  • ^ A. H. Strong. Systematic Theology: A Compendium Designed For The Use Of Theological Students. (London: Pickering & Inglis, 1970. Originally, 1907). p. 869.
  • ^ Berkhof, Systematic Theology. p. 532. 
  • ^ Ibid., p. 536.
  • ^ Frame, Systematic Theology. p. 987.
  • ^ Boyce, Abstract. p. 415.
  • ^ Philip Schaff. A Popular Commentary on the New Testament. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • a, b Adam Clarke. Commentary And Critical Notes On The Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ Boyce, Abstract. p. 412.
  • ^ Frame, Systematic Theology. p. 988.
  • ^ Grudem, Systematic Theology. p. 755.
  • ^ Frame, Systematic Theology. pp. 989-992.
  • ^ Robert L. Dabney. Systematic Theology. (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1985, originally 1871). pp. 665-666.
  • ^ Boyce, Abstract. pp. 418-421.
  • ^ Berkhof, Systematic Theology. pp. 535-536.
  • ^ Strong, Systematic Theology. p. 874.
  • ^ J. L. Dagg. A Manual of Theology. (Harrisonburg, VA: Sprinkle Pub. 2009, originally 1857). p. 286.
  • ^ Boyce, Abstract. pp. 418-419.
  • a, b Dabney, Systematic Theology. p. 666.
  • ^ Dagg, Manual. pp. 286-287.
  • ^ Grudem, Systematic Theology. p. 747.
  • ^ Charles J. Ellicott. Commentary For English Readers. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ Berkhof, Systematic Theology. p. 533.
  • ^ Dabney, Systematic Theology. p. 663.
  • ^ Grudem, Systematic Theology. p. 756.
  • ^ Ibid., p. 749.
  • ^ Berkhof, Systematic Theology. pp. 534-535.
  • ...

    1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 26: Of the Church - Commentary

    ...ese are elected by the people. The elders meet as the ruling body of each particular church, and the elders of a region meet together as a broader court, dealing with the ministry of the whole area. Usually once a year, all the elders of the denomination, or a representative group of them, meet as a General Assembly, or Synod, to resolve questions of importance to the whole church, as did the apostles and other leaders in Acts 15.[39]

    More may be said about Presbyterian polity, but I am not qualified to speak and criticize it. Pick a decent work on ecclesiology or a Systematic Theology and you will encounter the arguments for and against each church polity.

    Congregational Polity

    Our Baptist forefathers shared a common polity with the Congregationalists. The Congregationalists baptized infants but did not admit them into church membership. Many of the statements in this chapter of our Confession are identical to that of the Savoy appendix titled, “The Institution of Churches, and the Order Appointed in Them by Jesus Christ”. So what is Congregationalism actually? The name has in it the word congregation and in essence, it is simply what is said in this paragraph: final authority in ordering the church and governing the church belongs to the local congregation. It is variously defined based on whether one is a proponent or an opponent. Mark Dever has observed:

    One writer has defined it as “the claim of individual congregations to act as if they were alone in the world, independently of all other Christians,” (Roland Allen, Missionary Methods, p. 85n1). On the other hand, some of its champions have presented it as straight and simple democracy, tying it up with the inalienable rights of man. Charles Finney presented congregationalism this way:

    Episcopacy is well-suited to a state of general ignorance among the people. Presbyterianism, or Church Republicanism is better  suited to a more advanced state of intelligence and the prevalence of Christian principle. While Congregationalism, or spiritual Democracy, is best suited and only suited to a state of general intelligence, and the prevalence of Christian principle. (Charles Finney in his Lectures on Theology)[40]

    While acknowledging that the church is given elders to rule it, we likewise believe that every church is autonomous. It is not autonomous from God. It is autonomous from a higher earthly structure which governs it. Notice what the Confession here says about polity and what Congregationalists also say, the church is given autonomy and power to carry “on that order in worship and discipline, which he hath instituted for them to observe”. They are given power and authority to obey what King Jesus has commanded. They are not given power and authority to order the church as they like, but to order it as the Head of the church likes. So, we acknowledge, first of all, that Congregational polity does not lead to democracy and autonomy concerning the ordering and the public worship of the church. Secondly, it does not mean that there are no elders who rule the congregation. But it is simply, the belief that

    Whether in settling disputes between Christians (Matt 18:15-17; Acts 6:1-5), establishing correct doctrine (Gal 1:8; 2 Tim 4:3), or admitting and excluding members (2 Cor 2:6-8; 1 Cor 5:1-13), the local congregation has the duty and obligation to promote the continuance of a faithful gospel witness. No body outside of the whole congregation has this same degree of re...


    1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 22: Of Religious Worship and the Sabbath Day - Commentary

    ...-8/"part 7, part 8.
  • Getting the Garden Right: Adam’s Work and God’s Rest in Light of Christ. (Cape Coral, FL: Founders Press, 2017).
  • Roger T. Beckwith, Wilfrid Stott. This Is The Day: The Biblical Doctrine Of The Christian Sunday In Its Jewish And Early Church Setting. (London: Marshall, Morgan and Scott. 1978, 181 pp. Out of print). Can be found online.
  • Robert L. Dabney.
  • Charles Hodge. Systematic Theology, Volume 3. 1872. § 8. The Fourth Commandment.
  • A. H. Strong. Systematic Theology: A Compendium Designed For The Use Of Theological Students. (London: Pickering & Inglis, 1970. Originally, 1907). pp. 408-410.
  • Thomas Watson.
  • Ezekiel Hopkins. An Exposition Of The Ten Commandments. 1690. The Fourth Commandment. pp. 192-224.
  • Jonathan Edwards. The Works of Jonathan Edwards, Volume 2. Revised and corrected by Edward Hickman. (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1974 edition). pp. 93-103.
    • Three sermons entitled, “The Perpetuity and Change of the Sabbath” which could also be found online:
  • Samuel E. Waldron.
  • John Giarrizzo. The Lord’s Day Still Is. Booklet, 2013.
  • Philip Schaff. The Lord’s Day. Booklet, 2013.
  • A.A. Hodge. Sabbath, The Day Changed: The Sabbath Preserved.
  • Archibald Alexander. A Brief Compendium of Bible Truth. The Lord’s Day. 1846.
  • B.B. Warfield. The Foundations Of The Sabbath In The Word Of God. 1951.
  • Francis Turretin. The Fourth Question – The Lord’s Day. 1679-1685.
  • John Murray.
  • A.W. Pink. The Christian Sabbath.
    • His comments on the fall of Satan being prior to the seventh day so that he does not accept the common understanding of “rest,” I find very strange.
  • Ian Campbell. Why Easter Makes Me a Sabbatarian. The Aquila Report, 2012.
  • Jon English Lee. Biblical Theology and the Transfer of the Sabbath.
  • From Sabbath to Lord’s Day. Green Baggins, 2005.
  • Bob Gonzales
  • Tony Warren. Who Changed the Sabbath Day to Sunday. The Mountain Retreat, 1996.
  • Thomas Shepherd. The Change of The Sabbath.
  • Gleason L. Archer Jr. Encyclopedia Of Bible Difficulties. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Pub. House, 1982). pp. 116-121.
  • Nicholas T. Batzig. The Theological Significance of the Eighth Day. Feeding On Christ, 2014.
  • Audio Resources

    1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 29: Of Baptism - Commentary

    ...er to Thomas Wall’s Book, called, Baptism Anatomized, Together with a brief Answer to a part of Mr. Daniel William’s catechism, in his Book unto Youth. (London, 1691). p. 6.
  • ^ Benjamin Keach. Gold Refin’d, or, Baptism in its Primitive Purity. Edited by Simon Wartanian. (London, 1689). 12.
  • ^ A. H. Strong. Systematic Theology: A Compendium Designed For The Use Of Theological Students. (London: Pickering & Inglis, 1970. Originally, 1907). p. 931.
  • ^ Stanford E. Murrell. A Foundation For Faith An Introductory Study of Systematic Theology: With References To The Baptist Confession of Faith of 1689. p. 215.
  • a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k Albert Barnes’ Notes on the Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • a, b Jamieson, Fausset, Brown. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible (Full). Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ Thomas Patient. The Doctrine of Baptism, And the Distinction of the Covenant. Edited by Simon Wartanian (London, 1654). p. 22. Italics original.
  • ^ Wayne Grudem. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994). p. 969, n. 7. 
  • a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n John Gill. Exposition of the Entire Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ Strong, Systematic Theology. p. 945.
  • ^ Richard C. Barcellos, “An Exegetical Appraisal of Colossians 2:11-12” in Recovering A Covenantal Heritage: Essays In Baptist Covenant Theology. Edited by Richard C. Barcellos. (Palmdale, CA: RBAP, 2014). p. 459.
  • ^ William D. Mounce. Basics of Biblical Greek: Grammar. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan. Third Edition, 2013). p. 195.
  • ^ Understanding How Greek Verbs Work. (Blue Letter Bible). Emphasis original.
  • ^ Glossary of grammatical terms. Emphasis original.
  • ^ Barcellos, “Colossians 2:11-12”
  • a, b Ibid, p. 463.
  • ^ Ibid, p. 466.
  • ^ Ibid, p. 467.
  • a, b, c John Calvin. Commentaries. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ William D. Mounce. Mounce’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words. (Zondervan, 2006). p. 1150.
  • ^ Henry George Liddell, Scott Robert, Henry Stuart Jones. Liddell-Scott-Jones Lexicon of Classical Greek. Retrieved from TheWord Bible Software. See reference for the Strong’s number.
  • ^ Hercules Collins. The Antidote Proved a Counterfeit or Error Detected, and Believers Baptism Vindicated. (London, 1693). p. 13.
  • ^ John Owen in Covenant Theology: From Adam To Christ. Edited by Ronald D. Miller, James M. Renihan, Francisco Orozco. (Palmdale, CA: Reformed Baptist Academic Press, 2005). p. 198.
  • ^ Token. (The Free Dictionary).
  • ^ Seal. (Webster’s 1913 Dictionary).
  • ^ Mounce, Expository Dictionary. p. 620.
  • ^ Pledge. (The Free Dictionary).
  • a, b An Appendix. Second Baptist Confession Of Faith Of 1689.
  • ^ Collins, Believers Baptism from Heaven. pp. 12-13. Italics original.
  • ^ Keach, Gold Refin’d. pp. 75-76.
  • ^ The best summary for the case against the canonical inclusion of Mark 16:9-20 that I’ve read is Daniel M. Doriani, “Matthew 28:18-20 and the Institution of Baptism” in The Case For Covenantal Infant Baptism. Ed. Gregg Strawbridge. (Phillipsburg, NJ: P&R Publishing, 2003). pp. 43-48. See also James R. White. The King James Only Controversy: Can You Trust Modern Translations? (Bloomington, MN: Bethany House Publishers, 2009, 2nd. edition). pp. 316-320.
  • ^ Does Mark 16:16 teach that baptism is necessary for salvation? GotQuestions Ministries.
  • ^ Does Acts 2:38 teach that baptism is necessary for s...

  • 1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 2: Of God and of the Holy Trinity - Commentary

    ...1425729332&sr=8-1&keywords=sam+waldron"Modern Exposition of 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith which was apparently supplied by the Westminster Confession of Faith 1646.
  • ^ The outlines were taken from Alan Dunn’s exposition of this chapter over at Herald of Grace.
  • ^ John M. Frame. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Christian Belief. (Phillipsburg, NJ: P&R Publishing, 2014). p. 405.
  • a, b, c, d John Gill. Exposition of the Entire Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ Webster’s 1913 Dictionary. Incomprehensible.
  • ^ Wayne Grudem. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994). p. 150.
  • ^ Webster’s 1913 Dictionary. Immutable.
  • a, b, c Arthur W. Pink. Gleanings in the Godhead. 7. The Immutability of God.
  • ^ A. H. Strong. Systematic Theology: A Compendium Designed For The Use Of Theological Students. (London: Pickering & Inglis, 1970. Originally, 1907). p. 257.
  • ^ Louis Berkhof. Systematic Theology. (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Banner of Truth Trust. 1963). p. 67.
  • a, b, c, d, e John Calvin. Commentaries. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • a, b, c, d Albert Barnes’ Notes on the Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • a, b, c, d, e Matthew Poole. English Annotations on the Holy Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ A.H. Strong, Systematic Theology. p. 258.
  • ^ Anthropopathism. Wikipedia.
  • a, b The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Edited by J. J. S. Perowne. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ John Peter Lange. Commentary on the Holy Scriptures: Critical, Doctrinal, and Homiletical (25 volumes). Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ John Piper. The Repentance of God. Desiring God Ministries.
  • ^ R.C. Sproul. Divine Repentance. Reformation Theology.
  • a, b Jamieson, Fausset, Brown. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible (Full). Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ Shane Lems. The Repentance of God (Ex. 32:14). Emphasis added.
  • ^ Webster’s 1828 Dictionary. Impassibility.
  • ^ Berkhof, Systematic Theology. p. 60.
  • ^ Webster’s 1913 Dictionary. Absolute.
  • a, b The Cyclopedia of Biblical, Theological and Ecclesiastical Literature. Essence
  • ^ Webster’s 1828 English Dictionary. Essence.
  • ^ Ibid. Substance.
  • ^ The Cyclopedia of Biblical, Theological and Ecclesiastical Literature. Substance.
  • ^ Ibid. Hypostasis.
  • ^ Matt Slick. What is the Trinity? 
  • ^ Ibid. Person.
  • ^ James R. White. The Forgotten Trinity: Recovering the Heart of Christian Belief. (Minneapolis, MN: Bethany House. 1998). p. 26.
  • ^ Grudem, Systematic Theology. p. 226.
  • a, b, c, d, e Charles J. Ellicott. Commentary For English Readers. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ White, Forgotten Trinity. pp. 50-51.
  • a, b International Critical Commentary on the New Testament (ICCNT). Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • a, b, c The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Edited by J. J. S. Perowne. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • a, b, c, d, e Philip Schaff. A Popular Commentary on the New Testament. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ James R. White. The King James Only Controversy. (Minneapolis, MN: Bethany House. 2009, originally 1995). pp. 251-252.
  • ^ Strong, Systematic Theology. p. 306.
  • ^ White, KJV Controversy. pp. 334-335.
  • ^ Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges. Taken from the TrecoheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ The Holy Bible: English St...

  • 1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 11: Of Justification - Commentary

    ..."

    Footnotes

    1. ^ Many Scriptural references have been supplied by Samuel Waldron’s Modern Exposition of 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith which was apparently supplied by the Westminster Confession of Faith 1646.
    2. ^ Wayne Grudem. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994). Chapter 36, p. 723.
    3. ^ Louis Berkhof. Systematic Theology. (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Banner of Truth Trust. 1963). p. 513.
    4. a, b A. H. Strong. Systematic Theology: A Compendium Designed For The Use Of Theological Students. (London: Pickering & Inglis, 1970. Originally, 1907). p. 849. 
    5. ^ Catechism of the Catholic Church.
    6. ^ Taken from Matt Slick at CARM, The Roman Catholic view on justification.
    7. a, b, c, d Charles J. Ellicott. Commentary For English Readers. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    8. a, b, c, d, e, f John Calvin. Commentaries. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    9. a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h Albert Barnes’ Notes on the Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    10. a, b, c, d Joseph Henry Thayer’s Greek Definitions. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. See reference for the Strong’s number.
    11. ^ William D. Mounce. Mounce’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words. (Zondervan, 2006). p. 146.
    12. a, b Robert L. Dabney. Systematic Theology. (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1985). p. 620. 
    13. ^ Ibid., p. 374.
    14. ^ Berkhof, Systematic Theology. pp. 510-511.
    15. ^ Strong, Systematic Theology. p. 853.
    16. a, b, c, d, e, f Matthew Poole. English Annotations on the Holy Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    17. a, b, c, d, e Philip Schaff. A Popular Commentary on the New Testament. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    18. ^ Strong, Systematic Theology. p. 855.
    19. a, b, c, d, e John Gill. Exposition of the Entire Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    20. a, b, c, d The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Edited by J. J. S. Perowne. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    21. ^ International Critical Commentary on the New Testament (ICCNT). Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    22. ^ Berkhof, Systematic Theology. pp. 515-516. 
    23. ^ Dabney, Systematic Theology. p. 627.
    24. ^ The Holy Bible: English Standard Version: The ESV Study Bible. (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles. 2008). p. 2265.
    25. ^ William Robertson Nicoll. The Expositor’s Greek Testament. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    26. a, b Mickelson’s Enhanced Strong’s Greek and Hebrew Dictionaries. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. See reference for the Strong’s number.
    27. ^ Johann Albrecht Bengel. Gnomon of the NT. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    28. a, b, c, d, e, f, g Jamieson, Fausset, Brown. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible (Abridged). Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    29. ^ Joseph Benson. Commentary on the Old and New Testaments. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    30. ^ Explaining Regeneration Preceding Faith.
    31. ^ Grudem, Systematic Theology. Chapter 34, p. 704, n. 10.
    32. ^ Counting Faith as Righteousness. Ligonier Ministries.
    33. ^ Dabney, Systematic Theology. p. 638.
    34. ^ John Piper. Faith and the Imputation of Righteousness. Sermon from 1999.
    35. ^ J. L. Dagg. A Manual of Theology. (Harrisonburg, VA: Sprinkle Pub. 2009, originally 1857). pp. 269-270. Can also be found online.
    36. ^ 50 Things the Holy Spirit Does.
    37. ^ Dagg, Manual. p. 274.
    38. ^ John Flavel. Eternal Justification? Banner Of Truth, 2004.
    39. ^ Peter Pett. Commentary on t...

    Review of Wayne Grudem's Systematic Theology

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    1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 19: Of the Law of God - Commentary

    ... that all people know the moral law of God in paragraph 1. Above, I have tried to show continuity between the law of nature and the revealed moral law in Scripture and thereby show that the natural law was summarized on Sinai in ten commandments. In this section, I will unashamedly quote a lot from various authors from whom I’ve benefited. I have consulted the following works:

    I will have things to say myself, but I will likewise let men much wiser than me explain the Decalogue of God to us and to our benefit.

    It was a great and very helpful observation that I read in Calvin first and which is expressed in the words of the WLC that “where a duty is commanded, the contrary sin is forbidden; and, where a sin is forbidden, the contrary duty is commanded: so, where a promise is annexed, the contrary threatening is included; and, where a threatening is annexed, the contrary promise is included” (Q. 99, rule 4)[15]. This is a very helpful observation to see that the Decalogue not only calls us to abstain from sin, but at the same time to do the contrary of sin. Thus the sixth commandment not only commands unlawful killing, but also calls us to protect the lives of people and count life as precious. The ninth commandment not only commands refraining from false witness and lies, but also telling the truth at all times. I believe this is what is meant by the statement that the moral law was “summarized” in the Decalogue. To preserve life, to speak the truth, to be faithful to one’s spouse, to love God, to honor elders are self-evident moral truths, yet they are not explicitly commanded in the Decalogue, but we implicitly acknowledge that they’re included in the moral law.

    Preface To The Decalogue

    Exod. 20:1-2 And God spoke all these words, saying, 2 “I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery.

    God delivered Israel from bondage by grace. They certainly did not deserve the greatest redemption in the Old Testament and throughout their history, they demonstrated that. But the Lord delivered them according to His promise to the fathers and brought them with a mighty arm from slavery. He freed them by grace and now He gave them His laws so that they would walk in His ways. Israel received the moral, ceremonial and civil laws of God. In Exodus 20, the Lord Himself speaks to them the Ten Words of His covenant.

    It was the Lord Himself, not through the ministry of Moses as the other cases, Who spoke the Decalogue to all the people of Israel from Mt. Sinai (Deut. 4:33, 36; 5:4, 22). This demonstrates the special care of God concerning these commandments and displays their primacy that God Himself would declare their words to the people without a mediator. This shows us that God sees...