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1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 7: Of God's Covenant - Commentary

...
  • ^ Denault, Baptist Covenant Theology. p. 63 [footnotes references removed].
  • ^ Ibid. pp. 64-67 [footnote references removed].
  • a, b ESV Study Bible. (Crossway, 2008). Taken from the Online Version at www.esvbible.org
  • ^ John M. Frame. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Christian Belief. (Phillipsburg, NJ: P&R Publishing, 2014). p. 68, footnote references removed.
  • ^ Coxe, From Adam to Christ. p. 67.
  • a, b, c, d John Gill. Exposition of the Entire Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ Nehemiah Coxe in From Adam to Christ. p. 111.
  • ^ Pink, Divine Covenants. p. 96.
  • ^ Coxe, From Adam To Christ. p. 135.
  • ^ ibid., p. 116.
  • ^ Jeffrey D. Johnson, Recovering A Covenantal Heritage. p. 226.
  • ^ ibid., pp. 237-238.
  • ^ Pink, Divine Covenants. pp. 82-83.
  • ^ ibid., p. 83.
  • ^ Denault, Baptist Covenant Theology. p. 116.
  • ^ Coxe, From Adam To Christ. pp. 72-73.
  • ^ Coxe, From Adam To Christ. pp. 90-91.
  • ^ Pink, Divine Covenants. p. 100.
  • ^ ibid., p. 110.
  • ^ I have, by reading Jeffrey Johnson's works, the Fatal Flaw and the Kingdom of God, changed my position concerning whether the Mosaic offered eternal life or not. When writing the article at first I did not believe that it offered eternal life and used Lev. 18:5 for this point, but now I argue also using Lev. 18:5 that the Mosaic did offer eternal life, but no one was able to obtain it, except Christ the Lord. I'm not completely certain on this point, and could change.
  • ^ Recovering A Covenantal Heritage: Essays In Baptist Covenant Theology. Edited by Richard C. Barcellos. (Palmdale, CA: RBAP, 2014). p. 185.
  • ^ Van Dorn, Covenant Theology. pp. 99-100.
  • ^ Pink, Divine Covenants. p. 107.
  • ^ ibid., p. 109.
  • ^ John Owen. An Exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. Hebrews 8:6, but it can also be found in the Coxe/Owen volume pp. 187-188.
  • ^ ibid., in loc. It can also be found in the Coxe/Owen volume, pp. 197-198.
  • ^ Pink, Divine Covenants. p. 161.
  • ^ Jeffrey D. Johnson in Recovering A Covenantal Heritage, p. 232.
  • ^ Pink, Divine Covenants. p. 175.
  • a, b ibid., in loc.
  • ^ Denault, Baptist Covenant Theology. p. 71.
  • ^ ibid, p. 72.
  • ^ John Owen. An Exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc. Could also be found on pp. 178-179 of the Coxe/Owen volume.
  • ...

    1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 22: Of Religious Worship and the Sabbath Day - Commentary

    ...part 7, part 8.
  • Getting the Garden Right: Adam's Work and God's Rest in Light of Christ. (Cape Coral, FL: Founders Press, 2017).
  • Roger T. Beckwith, Wilfrid Stott. This Is The Day: The Biblical Doctrine Of The Christian Sunday In Its Jewish And Early Church Setting. (London: Marshall, Morgan and Scott. 1978, 181 pp. Out of print). Can be found online.
  • Robert L. Dabney.
  • Charles Hodge. Systematic Theology, Volume 3. 1872. § 8. The Fourth Commandment.
  • A. H. Strong. Systematic Theology: A Compendium Designed For The Use Of Theological Students. (London: Pickering & Inglis, 1970. Originally, 1907). pp. 408-410.
  • Thomas Watson.
  • Ezekiel Hopkins. An Exposition Of The Ten Commandments. 1690. The Fourth Commandment. pp. 192-224.
  • Jonathan Edwards. The Works of Jonathan Edwards, Volume 2. Revised and corrected by Edward Hickman. (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1974 edition). pp. 93-103.
    • Three sermons entitled, “The Perpetuity and Change of the Sabbath” which could also be found online:
  • Samuel E. Waldron.
  • John Giarrizzo. The Lord’s Day Still Is. Booklet, 2013.
  • Philip Schaff. The Lord’s Day. Booklet, 2013.
  • A.A. Hodge. Sabbath, The Day Changed: The Sabbath Preserved.
  • Archibald Alexander. A Brief Compendium of Bible Truth. The Lord’s Day. 1846.
  • B.B. Warfield. The Foundations Of The Sabbath In The Word Of God. 1951.
  • Francis Turretin. The Fourth Question – The Lord’s Day. 1679-1685.
  • John Murray.
  • A.W. Pink. The Christian Sabbath.
    • His comments on the fall of Satan being prior to the seventh day so that he does not accept the common understanding of “rest,” I find very strange.
  • Ian Campbell. Why Easter Makes Me a Sabbatarian. Reformation 21, 2012.
  • Jon English Lee. Biblical Theology and the Transfer of the Sabbath.
  • From Sabbath to Lord’s Day. Green Baggins, 2005.
  • Bob Gonzales
  • Tony Warren. Who Changed the Sabbath Day to Sunday. The Mountain Retreat, 1996.
  • Thomas Shepherd. The Change of The Sabbath.
  • Gleason L. Archer Jr. Encyclopedia Of Bible Difficulties. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Pub. House, 1982). pp. 116-121.
  • Nicholas T. Batzig. The Theological Significance of the Eighth Day. Feeding On Christ, 2014.
  • Audio Resources

    1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 29: Of Baptism - Commentary

    ...

    Footnotes

    1. ^ Many Scriptural references have been supplied by Samuel Waldron's Modern Exposition of 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith which was apparently supplied by the Westminster Confession of Faith 1646.
    2. ^ A. H. Strong. Systematic Theology: A Compendium Designed For The Use Of Theological Students. (London: Pickering & Inglis, 1970. Originally, 1907). p. 931.
    3. ^ Stanford E. Murrell. A Foundation For Faith An Introductory Study of Systematic Theology: With References To The Baptist Confession of Faith of 1689. p. 215.
    4. a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    5. a, b Jamieson, Fausset, Brown. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible (Full). Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    6. ^ Wayne Grudem. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine. Zondervan (1994). p. 969, n. 7. 
    7. a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m John Gill. Exposition of the Entire Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
    8. ^ Strong, Systematic Theology. p. 945.
    9. ^ Recovering A Covenantal Heritage: Essays In Baptist Covenant Theology. Edited

      ...

    1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 2: Of God and of the Holy Trinity - Commentary

    ...p;qid=1425729332&sr=8-1&keywords=sam+waldron"Modern Exposition of 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith which was apparently supplied by the Westminster Confession of Faith 1646.
  • ^ The outlines were taken from Alan Dunn's exposition of this chapter over at Herald of Grace.
  • ^ John M. Frame. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Christian Belief. (Phillipsburg, NJ: P&R Publishing, 2014). p. 405.
  • a, b, c, d John Gill. Exposition of the Entire Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ Webster’s 1913 Dictionary. Incomprehensible.
  • ^ Wayne Grudem. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994). p. 150.
  • ^ Webster's 1913 Dictionary. Immutable.
  • a, b, c Arthur W. Pink. Gleanings in the Godhead. 7. The Immutability of God.
  • ^ A. H. Strong. Systematic Theology: A Compendium Designed For The Use Of Theological Students. (London: Pickering & Inglis, 1970. Originally, 1907). p. 257.
  • ^ Louis Berkhof, p. 67.
  • a, b, c, d, e John Calvin. Commentaries. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • a, b, c, d Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • a, b, c, d, e Matthew Poole. English Annotations on the Holy Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ A.H. Strong, Systematic Theology. p. 258.
  • ^ Anthropopathism. Wikipedia.
  • a, b The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Edited by J. J. S. Perowne. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ John Peter Lange. Commentary on the Holy Scriptures: Critical, Doctrinal, and Homiletical (25 volumes). Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ John Piper. The Repentance of God. Desiring God Ministries.
  • ^ R.C. Sproul. Divine Repentance. Reformation Theology.
  • a, b Jamieson, Fausset, Brown. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible (Full). Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ Shane Lems. The Repentance of God (Ex. 32:14)
  • ^ Webster's 1828 Dictionary. Impassibility.
  • ^ Louis Berkhof. Systematic Theology. (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Banner of Truth Trust. 1963). p. 60.
  • ^ Webster's 1913 Dictionary. Absolute.
  • a, b The Cyclopedia of Biblical, Theological and Ecclesiastical Literature. Essence
  • ^ Webster's 1828 English Dictionary. Essence.
  • ^ Ibid. Substance.
  • ^ The Cyclopedia of Biblical, Theological and Ecclesiastical Literature. Substance.
  • ^ Ibid. Hypostasis.
  • ^ Matt Slick. What is the Trinity? 
  • ^ Ibid. Person.
  • ^ James R. White. The Forgotten Trinity: Recovering the Heart of Christian Belief. (Minneapolis, MN: Bethany House. 1998). p. 26.
  • ^ Wayne Grudem, Systematic Theology. p. 226.
  • a, b, c, d, e Charles J. Ellicott. Commentary For English Readers. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ James R. White. The Forgotten Trinity: Recovering the Heart of Christian Belief. (Minneapolis, MN: Bethany House. 1998). pp. 50-51.
  • a, b International Critical Commentary on the New Testament (ICCNT). Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • a, b, c The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Edited by J. J. S. Perowne. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • a, b, c, d, e Philip Schaff. A Popular Commentary on the New Testament. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ James R. White. The King James Only Controversy. (Minneapolis, MN: Bethany House. 2009, originally 1995). pp. 251-252.
  • ^ A. H. Strong. Systematic Theology: A Compendium Designed For The Use Of Theological Students. (London: Pickering & Inglis, 1970. Original...

  • Review of Wayne Grudem's Systematic Theology

    ...ection> ...

    1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 31: Of the State of Man after Death and Of the Resurrection of the Dead - Commentary

    ...n interesting discussion. But I do not in anyway imply that I have reached a final conclusion on their meaning, yet I find myself persuaded by Dr. Shedd's thorough case. There is evidence from the New Testament (Luke 16:19-31) that Hades is called “a place of torment.” Therefore, it is irrelevant to the point I wanted to prove under this section, which was that the wicked go directly into punishment after death, what the relationship is between Sheol and Hades and what their nature exactly is. It is sufficient that Luke 16 describes it as a place of torment. If you want to read more on the subject of Sheol and Hades check:

    • Louis Berkhof. Systematic Theology. (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Banner of Truth Trust. 1963). pp. 681-686.
    • Anthony A. Hoekema. The Bible And The Future. (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1979). pp. 95-101. (He interacts with Berkhof)
    • Sam E. Waldron. A Modern Exposition Of The 1689 Baptist Confession Of Faith. (Darlington: Evangelical Press, 2013). pp. 493-498.
    • William G. T. Shedd. Dogmatic Theology. Volume 2. (Originally published 1888). pp. 591-609, 619-640. (This is thorough. Refutation of the two-compartments theory, Sheol means the grave or the place of punishment for the wicked, the righteous go to Heaven)

    Dr. Shedd, concluding his study on Hades and Sheol, writes:

    From this examination of texts, it appears that Sheol in the Old Testament has the same two significations that Hades has in the New. The only difference is that in the Old Testament, Sheol less often in proportion to the whole number of instances denotes “hell” and more often the “grave” than Hades does in the New Testament. And this, for the reason that the doctrine of future retribution was more fully revealed and developed by Christ and his apostles than it was by Moses and the prophets.
    If after this study of the biblical data, there still be doubt whether Sheol and Hades.[10]

    Another passage which speaks about the torments of the wicked in the Intermediate State is 2 Peter 2:9. There we read that the unrighteous are kept under punishment until the day of judgment. They are said to be kept under punishment until the solemn day of judgment, as the angels and the present world are (2Pet. 2:4; 3:7). They are under punishment now, but a greater punishment will they receive on the day of judgment when they will have to answer for every thought, word, and deed. There is no second chance after death (Heb. 9:27; the rich man and Lazarus) and that's why it is important to heed the call of the Gospel. We cannot escape God's just punishment if we do not heed the Gospel. The Gospel is the way to escape from God's wrath, otherwise we stand naked before His holy wrath.

    “There is no peace,” says the LORD, “for the wicked.” 

    (Isaiah 48:22)


    §2 The Parousia

    1. At the last day, such of the saints as are found alive, shall not sleep, but be changed; and all the dead shall be raised up 2 with the selfsame bodies, and none other; although with different qualities, which shall be united again to their souls forever. 5
      1. 1 Cor. 15:50-53; 2 Cor. 5:1-4; 1 Thess. 4:17
      2. Dan. 12:2; John 5:28-29; Acts 24:15
      3. Job 19:26-27; John 5:28-29; 1 Cor 15:35-38, 42-44
      4. 1 Cor. 15:42-44, 52-54
      5. Dan. 12:2; Matt. 25:46

    At the last day...saints that are found alive will be changed and not sleep, i.e., not die first (1Thess. 4:15-17; 1Cor. 15:50-53). They basically receive the resurrection body without first dying, but by b...


    1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 1: Of the Holy Scriptures - Commentary

    ...e-id="xflp1" id="footnote-11"^ Catechism of the Catholic Church: With Modifications From The Editio Typica. (Double Day; 2nd edition, 2003). p. 31, number 80. Footnote reference removed.
  • ^ Ibid., number 82.
  • ^ Gregg R. Allison. Historical Theology: An Introduction To Christian Doctrine: A Companion To Wayne Grudem's Systematic Theology. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2011). p. 44.
  • ^ John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion. 1.7.2
  • ^ John M. Frame. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Christian Belief. (P&R Publishing, 2014). p. 595.
  • a, b Alan M. Stibbs, etc. The Scripture Cannot Be Broken: Twentieth Century Writings On The Doctrine Of Inerrancy. Edited By John Macarthur. (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2013). p. 205.
  • ^ Wayne Grudem. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994). pp. 74-75.
  • a, b, c, d, e John Calvin. Commentaries. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ Alan Stibbs, Scripture Cannot Be Broken, pp. 207-208.
  • a, b John MacArthur. The MacArthur Study Bible: English Standard Version. (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2010). p. 1904.
  • a, b, c, d, e, f Philip Schaff. A Popular Commentary on the New Testament. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc. 
  • a, b, c Joseph Henry Thayer's Greek Definitions. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. See reference for the Strong's number.
  • ^ Catechism of the Catholic Church: With Modifications From The Editio Typica. (Double Day; 2nd edition, 2003). Number 120, p. 40.
  • ^ Aaron Brake. Is the Apocrypha Scripture?
  • ^ Flavius Josephus. The Complete Works of Josephus. Translated by William Whiston. (Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson, 1998). Against Apion, 1:8, pp. 929-930. Verse divisions omitted.
  • ^ Gregg Allison, p. 38, n. 3. Numbering within brackets supplied by me.
  • ^ Babylonian Talmud. Mas. Yoma 9b. The words of R. Abba. Words within bracket added by me because of the footnote attached.
  • ^ Good News Translation (GNT). 1 Maccabees 4:41-46.
  • ^ . 1 Maccabees 9:23-27.
  • ^ Grudem, Systematic Theology. p. 57, footnote references removed.
  • ^ John Piper. A Peculiar Glory: How the Christian Scriptures Reveal Their Complete Truthfulness. p. 48.
  • ^ Bruce, The Canon of Scripture, 31, his italics. As quoted in Adam Brake, Is the Apocrypha Scripture?
  • ^ Eusebius. Ecclesiastical History. Book IV, chapter 26.
  • ^ Ibid. chapter 22:8.
  • ^ Ibid. n. 1244.
  • ^ Clements First Letter to the Corinthians, chapters 57.
  • ^ Eusebius. chapter 26, n. 1314.
  • ^ Gregg Allison, pp. 48-49. Footnote references removed. Content with brackets not mine, but Dr. Allison’s.
  • a, b Roy E. Knuteson. Why We Reject The Apocrypha. p. 6.
  • ^ Judith 1. United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.
  • ^ Metzger, An Introduction to the Apocrypha, 50-51. As quoted in Adam Brake, Is the Apocrypha Scripture?
  • ^ Geisler and MacKenzie, Roman Catholics and Evangelicals, 167. As quoted in Adam Brake, Is the Apocrypha Scripture?
  • ^ John Calvin. Institutes of the Christian Religion. Translated by Henry Beveridge. (Hendrickson Publishers Marketing, LLC, 2008). pp. 33-34. 1.7.5.
  • ^ Grudem, Systematic Theology. p. 77.
  • ^ John Calvin, p. 33. 1.7.4.
  • ^ Sinclair B. Ferguson. The Authority, Sufficiency, Finality of Scripture. Monergism.com
  • a, b Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Edited by J. J. S. Perowne. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. In loc.
  • ^ Camb...

  • 1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 17: Of The Perseverance of the Saints - Commentary

    ...p://www.wordmodules.com/the-word-modules/file/286-works-of-john-gill/"Exposition of the Entire Bible. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. Hebrews 6:4-9. Can also be read at here.
  • Arthur W. Pink. Exposition of Hebrews. Taken from the TheWord Bible Software. Chapters 24-27. His commentary on Hebrews 6 can be found here.
  • Wayne Grudem. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994). Chapter 40.
  • John M. Frame. Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Christian Belief. (Phillipsburg, NJ: P&R Publishing, 2014). Chapter 44.
  • J. Ligon Duncan III – Falling Away? (Sermon)
  • Mathew Poole - English Annotations on the Holy Bible. Commentary on Hebrews 6, here.
  • William Burkitt – Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. Commentary on Hebrews 6, here
  • Albert Barnes - Notes on the New Testament. Commentary on Hebrews 6, here. He accepts that the descriptions describe a true Christian, but rejects that it is possible for a true Christian to apostatize.
  • Robert Jamieson, Andrew Robert Fausset, David Brown – Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible. Commentary on Hebrews 6, here.
  • Matthew Henry – Complete Commentary on the Bible. Commentary on Hebrews 6, here.
  • Bob Utley – You Can Understand The Bible (Not that explicit). Commentary on Hebrews 6, here and here.
  • John Owen – Exposition of Hebrews. Commentary on Hebrews 6, here.
  • Steven J. Cole – Lesson 17: When Repentance Becomes Impossible (Hebrews 6:4-8).
  • The passage describes regenerate believers who have fallen away:

    I have collected some commentaries, articles, and sermons on this passage in a document which you can download (it does not include all the commentaries listed above).

    I believe that the passage speaks about false believers and warns those who have sat under the preaching of the Word of God, the manifestation of the Spirit’s work and who themselves have professed to belong to Christ that they will perish eternally without no possibility of true repentance if they do not have true faith. The description is not definitive proof that those spoken of are true believers, because the analogy in vv. 7-8 moves us to say that those spoken of were unbelievers from the start. I don’t claim that by me consulting articles and commentaries on this passage that I will have an answer to every question on this passage. But what I do want to claim is that there are interpretations which are credible and do not force us to deny other biblical doctrines (i.e., the Perseverance of the Saints). I do want to stress the context of Hebrews that it is an epistle written to Hebrew Christians steeped into the Old Testament and Israel’s history, therefore I will try to interpret it with this in mind and not try to make a modern application every time.

    Audience

    Who are the ones being described in this passage? Is the audience the ones being described in vv. 4-6? No, they are not. Rather, they are a different group spoken of in the third person (“those” v. 4, “them…they…their own” v. 6). The Author is not describing his present audience. In fact, he explicitly says that in v. 9. Previous to this passage the author spoke in the plural “you” to the audience (e.g. Heb. 5:1...


    1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 26: Of the Church - Commentary

    ...rsons who may administer the ordinance of the Lord’s Supper and Baptism. They are those who are recognized in the church and by the church, as officers. Often, the elders will take these tasks upon themselves, but I do not believe that members may not participate in administration. Though it is wiser to let the elders who are thus ordained administer the sacraments and they may occasionally choose some members to help them in the administration. 

    Now we should make a brief case for church membership and the two church offices, elders and deacons. I've been greatly helped in my understanding of the Church and Church Government by Dr. Wayne Grudem in part 6 of his Systematic Theology.

    Members

    I attended the current church I go to for more than 2 years until I became a member. I did not see the necessity of me becoming a member and to be honest, I was unwilling to commit myself to the congregation. I thought, if I would want to leave, then it would not be a problem. I would just stop coming. There are some people who think that church membership is something unbiblical. Where does the Bible speak of church membership? There is nothing about church membership in the Bible! These kinds of arguments sound persuasive, but they do not prove that the Bible does not teach church membership.

    What we need to understand about the issue of church membership is what church membership actually entails. Basically, it entails a few things. 1) A commitment to the local body of Christ, to worship and serve there. 2) To be under the rule, care, discipline, and teaching of the elders. 3) To have a place from whence the Great Commission is to be carried out. Other points could be added, but church membership has “commitment" at its core. When a Christian becomes a member of a particular congregation, they are committing themselves to that local body. They see the need for Christians to flock together, therefore, they join themselves to a local body of Christ and seek to serve their King there. This is the place where they are nurtured and where they may minister or be ministered by others. Church membership is just that, one's commitment to the local body of Christ. When one wants to become a member of a local church, they are committing themselves to that church. There may be requirements for church membership. Most Baptist churches require that the members must be baptized, others do not think that it matters. There may be (there should be!) a confession of faith or a creed which the member would sign. This is the meaning and point of church membership. Therefore, while we readily admit that we do not have commands to become church members, yet we see church membership presupposed in the New Testament! How? Let’s see!

    Even in the early church, the church kept a record of its members. The believers were a recognizable body of 120 prior to Pentecost (Acts 1:15). How was this known? Was a list kept of who was in? What about the 3000 who were “added” on the day of Pentecost (Acts 2:41)? The obvious question here is, “to what they were added?” The obvious answer is: to the body of believers. They were added to the church in Jerusalem. So, the local church which began with 120 members gained 3000 more members in one day. These people came under the authority and were part of the Jerusalem church. They became committed to Christ and His body, and they showed that by their baptism. This point, in my opinion, points to the idea of church membership and th...


    1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 19: Of the Law of God - Commentary

    ... that all people know the moral law of God in paragraph 1. Above, I have tried to show continuity between the law of nature and the revealed moral law in Scripture and thereby show that the natural law was summarized on Sinai in ten commandments. In this section, I will unashamedly quote a lot from various authors from whom I’ve benefited. I have consulted the following works:

    I will have things to say myself, but I will likewise let men much wiser than me explain the Decalogue of God to us and to our benefit.

    It was a great and very helpful observation that I read in Calvin first and which is expressed in the words of the WLC that “where a duty is commanded, the contrary sin is forbidden; and, where a sin is forbidden, the contrary duty is commanded: so, where a promise is annexed, the contrary threatening is included; and, where a threatening is annexed, the contrary promise is included” (Q. 99, rule 4)[15]. This is a very helpful observation to see that the Decalogue not only calls us to abstain from sin, but at the same time to do the contrary of sin. Thus the sixth commandment not only commands unlawful killing, but also calls us to protect the lives of people and count life as precious. The ninth commandment not only commands refraining from false witness and lies, but also telling the truth at all times. I believe this is what is meant by the statement that the moral law was “summarized” in the Decalogue. To preserve life, to speak the truth, to be faithful to one’s spouse, to love God, to honor elders are self-evident moral truths, yet they are not explicitly commanded in the Decalogue, but we implicitly acknowledge that they’re included in the moral law.

    Preface To The Decalogue

    Exod. 20:1-2 And God spoke all these words, saying, 2 “I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery.

    God delivered Israel from bondage by grace. They certainly did not deserve the greatest redemption in the Old Testament and throughout their history, they demonstrated that. But the Lord delivered them according to His promise to the fathers and brought them with a mighty arm from slavery. He freed them by grace and now He gave them His laws so that they would walk in His ways. Israel received the moral, ceremonial and civil laws of God. In Exodus 20, the Lord Himself speaks to them the Ten Words of His covenant.

    It was the Lord Himself, not through the ministry of Moses as the other cases, Who spoke the Decalogue to all the people of Israel from Mt. Sinai (Deut. 4:33, 36; 5:4, 22). This demonstrates the special care of God concerning these commandments and displays their primacy that God Himself would declare their words to the people without a mediator. This shows us that God sees...