The Staunch Calvinist

"Absolute sovereignty is what I love to ascribe to God." - Jonathan Edwards

Search


You searched for 'Infallibility'

I've found 6 results!


1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 1: Of the Holy Scriptures - Commentary

...hs in which I deal with parts of the Scripture's doctrine are not necessarily in logical order, therefore, here are the topics in a somewhat more logical order:

  1. Necessity of Scripture (paragraph 1)
  2. Scripture As Self-Revelation (paragraph 1)
  3. Canon of the Old Testament (paragraph 4)
  4. Canon of the New Testament (paragraph 3)
  5. Inspiration of Scripture (paragraph 2)
  6. Inerrancy and Infallibility of Scripture (paragraph 1)
  7. Authority of Scripture (paragraph 4)
  8. Sufficiency of Scripture (paragraph 6)
  9. Sola Scriptura (paragraph 110)
  10. Authentication of Scripture (paragraph 5)
  11. Perspicuity of Scripture  (paragraph 7)
  12. Interpretation of Scripture (paragraph 9)

This chapter is in many ways based upon the truths in 2 Timothy 3:16. All the particular subjects which are treated are part of a unified whole doctrine about God's Word.


§1 The Holy Scripture is the only sufficient, certain, and infallible rule

  1. The Holy Scripture is the only sufficient, certain, and infallible rule of all saving knowledge, faith, and obedience 1, although the light of nature, and the works of creation and providence do so far manifest the goodness, wisdom, and power of God, as to leave men inexcusable 2; yet are they not sufficient to give that knowledge of God and his will which is necessary unto salvation. 3 Therefore it pleased the Lord at sundry times and in divers manners to reveal himself, and to declare that his will unto his church 4; and afterward for the better preserving and propagating of the truth, and for the more sure establishment and comfort of the church against the corruption of the flesh, and the malice of Satan, and of the world, to commit the same wholly unto writing; which maketh the Holy Scriptures to be most necessary 5, those former ways of God's revealing his will unto his people being now ceased. 6
    1. Isa. 8:20; Luke 16:29; Eph. 2:20; 2 Tim. 3:15-17[1]
    2. Ps. 19:1-3; Rom. 1:19-21, 32; 2:12a, 14-15
    3. Ps. 19:1-3 with vv. 7-11; Rom. 1:19-21; 2:12a, 14-15 with 1:16-17; and 3:21
    4. Heb. 1:1-2a
    5. Prov. 22:19-21; Luke 1:1-4; 2 Peter 1:12-15; 3:1; Deut. 17:18ff; 31:9ff, 19ff; 1 Cor. 15:1; 2 Thess. 2:1-2, 15; 3:17; Rom. 1:8-15; Gal. 4:20; 6:11; 1 Tim. 3:14ff; Rev. 1:9, 19; 2:1 etc.; Rom. 15:4; 2 Peter 1:19-21
    6. Heb. 1:1-2a; Acts 1:21-22; 1 Cor. 9:1; 15:7-8; Eph. 2:20

Holy Scripture, which is defined to be the 66 books of the Old and New Testaments, is “sufficient, certain, and infallible”. This means that Scripture is enough; true and sure; and cannot err. What is the scope of this sufficiency, certainty, and Infallibility? The Confession says that Scripture is the only infallible “rule of all saving knowledge, faith, and obedience”. Holy Scripture is given as a measuring line and a standard. It is a standard of standards. There are other standards and rules besides the Bible, but the Bible alone is the “sufficient, certain, and infallible rule”. The Bible is the norm and rule to test everything else by.

Paragraph 1 then moves to speak about the insufficiency of general revelation for salvation. The “light of nature, and the works of creation and providence” demonstrate that there is a powerful God Who is the Creator of everything. Yet this knowledge is not sufficient to save. Although it is sufficient to leave men inexcusable. This is basically Paul's argument in Romans 1:18-32. Men know the God Who exists because of the creation which they are able to observe and because God has revealed Hi...


1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 17: Of The Perseverance of the Saints - Commentary

...: #00ffff;" immutability of the decree of election, flowing from the free and unchangeable love of God the Father, upon the efficacy of the merit and intercession of Jesus Christ and union with him, 3 the oath of God, the abiding of his Spirit, and the seed of God within them, 5 and the nature of the covenant of grace; from all which ariseth also the certainty and Infallibility thereof. 6
  1. Phil. 2:12-13; Rom. 9:16; John 6:37,44
  2. Matt. 24:22, 24, 31; Rom. 8:30; 9:11, 16; 11:2, 29; Eph 1:5-11
  3. Eph. 1:4; Rom. 5:9-10; 8:31-34; 2 Cor. 5:14; Rom. 8:35-38; 1 Cor. 1:8-9; John 14:19; 10:28-29
  4. Heb. 6:16-20
  5. 1 John 2:19-20, 27; 3:9; 5:4, 18; 2 Cor. 1:22; Eph. 1:13; 4:30; 2 Cor. 1:22; 5:5; Eph. 1:14
  6. Jer. 31:33-34; 32:40; Heb. 10:11-18; 13:20-21

Our perseverance and remaining in the state of grace and in Christ does not depend upon our free will. It does not come from our own power and strength. If it be dependent upon our free will then we would all fall from grace. Rather, it depends upon a few things from the side of God.

1) Our perseverance depends upon the immutability of the decree of election. We “are predestinated, or foreordained to eternal life through Jesus Christ” (chapter 3:3). This decree of election cannot be altered and if one of the elect would not obtain eternal life in eternity this would mean that it failed and it was, in fact, immutable. This immutability flows from the free and unchangeable love of God the Father for the elect, Whom He “in love” predestined (Eph. 1:4-5). This amazing love was set on the elect before the creation of the world and will never cease or change. 2) Our perseverance depends upon the efficacy of the merit and intercession of Jesus Christ and union with Him (Rom. 8:34-38). He obtained for us everything necessary to be saved and remain in the state of grace. Furthermore, He keeps interceding for us before the Father for forgiveness, grace, strength, and everything necessary for our final salvation and perseverance. 3) Our perseverance depends upon the oath of God (Heb. 6:16-20 ). God has promised to save us and will not fail. He will not go back from His word and therefore, this is a sure foundation of faith and perseverance for us. 4) Our perseverance depends upon the abiding of His Spirit, and the seed of God in us (1John 2:19-20; 3:9; Eph. 1:13; 4:30). The seed of God probably refers to the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is the One Who grants us grace, strength, faith and the ability to do that which is pleasing to God. He is the guarantee of our final salvation (Eph. 4:30). The fact that we have the Spirit means that we forever belong to God. He has come to make His abode in us and will never leave His abode. 5) Our perseverance depends upon the nature of the covenant of grace (Jer. 33:31-34; 32:40), which is fully gracious, granting that which it requires. 

The certainty and Infallibility of the final salvation of the elect and their perseverance do not depend on things in them, but external to them. Things which God does and God has set in place. Our salvation, from the beginning and unto all eternity, solely due to grace—the amazing grace of the triune God!


Much of what is described in this paragraph has already been argued for when surveying the passages for the Perseverance of the Saints, therefore, I will refer the interested reader to the relevant passages.

Perseverance Depends Not On Man

God is the One who sanctifies us. It is He who work...


1689 Second Baptist Confession of Faith Highlighted

...le="color: #ffa500;"depends not upon their own free will, but upon the immutability of the decree of election, flowing from the free and unchangeable love of God the Father, upon the efficacy of the merit and intercession of Jesus Christ and union with him, the oath of God, the abiding of his Spirit, and the seed of God within them, and the nature of the covenant of grace; from all which ariseth also the certainty and Infallibility thereof.
  1. Phil. 2:12-13; Rom. 9:16; John 6:37,44
  2. Matt. 24:22, 24, 31; Rom. 8:30; 9:11, 16; 11:2, 29; Eph 1:5-11
  3. Eph. 1:4; Rom. 5:9-10; 8:31-34; 2 Cor. 5:14; Rom. 8:35-38; 1 Cor. 1:8-9; John 14:19; 10:28-29
  4. Heb. 6:16-20
  5. 1 John 2:19-20, 27; 3:9; 5:4, 18; 2 Cor. 1:22; Eph. 1:13; 4:30; 2 Cor. 1:22; 5:5; Eph. 1:14
  6. Jer. 31:33-34; 32:40; Heb. 10:11-18; 13:20-21
  1. And though they may, through the temptation of Satan and of the world, the prevalency of corruption remaining in them, and the neglect of means of their preservation, fall into grievous sins, and for a time continue therein, whereby they incur God's displeasure and grieve his Holy Spirit, come to have their graces and comforts impaired, have their hearts hardened, and their consciences wounded, hurt and scandalize others, and bring temporal judgments upon themselves, yet shall they renew their repentance and be preserved through faith in Christ Jesus to the end.
    1. Matt. 26:70, 72, 74
    2. Ps. 38:1-8; Isa 54:5-9; Eph 4:30; 1 Thess. 5:14
    3. Ps. 51:10-12
    4. Ps. 32:3-4; 73:21-22
    5. 2 Sam. 12:14; 1 Cor. 8:9-13; Rom. 14:13-18; 1 Tim. 6:1-2; Titus 2:5
    6. 2 Sam. 12:14f; Gen. 19:30-38; 1 Cor. 11:27-32
    7. Luke 22:32, 61-62; 1 Cor. 11:32; 1 John 3:9; 5:18

Chapter 18: Of the Assurance of Grace and Salvation [Return] [Commentary]

  1. Although temporary believers, and other unregenerate men, may vainly deceive themselves with false hopes and carnal presumptions of being in the favour of God and state of salvation, which hope of theirs shall perish; yet such as truly believe in the Lord Jesus, and love him in sincerity, endeavouring to walk in all good conscience before him, may in this life be certainly assured that they are in the state of grace, and may rejoice in the hope of the glory of God, which hope shall never make them ashamed.
    1. Job 8:13, 14; Jer. 17:9; Matt. 7:21-23; Luke 18:10-14; John 8:41; Eph. 5:6-7; Gal. 6:3, 7-9
    2. Rom. 5:2, 5; 8:16; 1 John 2:3; 3:14, 18-19, 24; 5:13; 2 Peter 1:10
  1. This certainty is not a bare conjectural and probable persuasion grounded upon a fallible hope, but an infallible assurance of faith founded on the blood and righteousness of Christ revealed in the Gospel; and also upon the inward evidence of those graces of the Spirit unto which promises are made, and on the testimony of the Spirit of adoption, witnessing with our spirits that we are the children of God; and, as a fruit thereof, keeping the heart both humble and holy.
    1. Rom. 5:2, 5; Heb. 6:11, 19-20; 1 John 3:2, 14; 4:16; 5:13, 19-20
    2. Heb. 6:17-18; 7:22; 10:14, 19
    3. Matt. 3:7-10; Mark 1:15; 2 Peter 1:4-11; 1 John 2:3; 3:14, 18-19, 24; 5:13
    4. Rom. 8:15-16; 1 Cor. 2:12; Gal. 4:6-7
    5. 1 John 3:1-3
  1. This infallible assurance doth not so belong to the essence of faith, but that a true believer may wait long, and conflict with many difficulties before he be partaker of it; yet being enabled by the Spirit to know the things which are freely given him of God, he may, without extraordi...

John Owen's Case For Particular Atonement

..., “save forever” (NASB), “save to the very end” (YLT), is grounded upon His intercession. Those who draw near to God, draw near to God through Him (cf. John 14:6). But we know that it is God Himself who draws us to Himself through Christ (John 6:44). In this way, everyone who draws near to Christ, Christ is able and willing to save to the uttermost—to the very end and thus accomplish the will of the Father.

Christ does much more than we ask. Just as He prayed for Peter (Luke 22:31-32), so likewise He prays for the faith of His elect. In short, Christ prays that the fruits of His death may be applied to all His people.

The Infallibility of Christ’s Intercession

The foundation on which Christ’s intercession is built is upon the fact that He always does the will of God. His mission from the Father was to accomplish the work which He had given Him (John 17:4) and that the Lord Christ certainly did. He came not to do His own will, but the will of the Father (John 6:38). What is the Father’s will for Him? “And this is the will of him who sent me, that I should lose nothing of all that he has given me, but raise it up on the last day” (John 6:39). Basically, that He should save them and keep them to all eternity. Well, the question now is: “Is Christ able to accomplish that which the Father wills for Him?”

To answer this question negatively is blasphemy. To entertain the thought that our Christ could in any way, shape or form disobey the will of the Father is not worthy of His glory. He laid down His prerogative as God and became like us, to obey the will of the Father and accomplish that work which was given to Him to do. That work, our Lord says, that He certainly accomplished (John 17:4). Furthermore, we have a clear word from the Savior as to the attitude of the Father towards Him. The Lord says:

John 11:42 I knew that you always hear me, but I said this on account of the people standing around, that they may believe that you sent me.”

Even those who knew Him knew that the Father will do whatever Christ asks (John 11:22). Christ on another occasion says that He “always do[es] the things that are pleasing to him [the Father]” (John 8:29). Well, it is the will of the Father that He give eternal life and kept for eternity all those who were given to Him (e.g. John 6:37-44; 17:1-5). Will the Lord ever fail to accomplish the will of the Father? Perish the thought! The Father always hears Him, because just like the Spirit, the Lord Christ—our faithful High Priest—intercedes according to God’s will (Rom. 8:27), therefore, His intercession can never fail. This is the firm foundation on which we stand.

Christ died and intercedes for the same group. Christ died that those for whom He died should be saved and by His intercession, He applies the benefits of His work to them in time. He never fails in His intercession. Since it is evident that not all men have faith or will be saved, therefore, Christ did not die in their stead, neither does He intercede for them.

Although I have added my own exegesis of the passages above, I have greatly benefited from Owen's insight into the connection between Christ sacrifice and His subsequent intercession. This is, in my opinion, a very powerful argument for Particular Atonement. Even if we take into consideration the work of the High Priest on behalf of Israel, for example, on the Day of Atonement (Lev. 16). It will quickly be replied by our opponents that the High Priest interce...


1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 8: Of Christ the Mediator - Commentary

...ever” (NASB), “save to the very end” (YLT), is grounded upon His intercession. Those who draw near to God, draw near to God through Him (cf. John 14:6). But we know that it is God Himself who draws us to Himself through Christ (John 6:44). In this way, everyone who draws near to Christ, Christ is able and willing to save to the uttermost—to the very end and thus accomplish the will of the Father (e.g. John 6:39).

Christ does much more than we ask. Just as He prayed for Peter (Luke 22:31-32), so likewise He prays for the faith of His elect. In short, Christ prays that the fruits of His death may be applied to all His people.

The Infallibility of Christ’s Intercession

The foundation on which Christ’s intercession is built is upon the fact that He always does the will of God. His mission from the Father was to accomplish the work which He had given Him (John 17:4) and that the Lord Christ certainly did. He came not to do His own will, but the will of the Father (John 6:38). What is the Father’s will for Him? “And this is the will of him who sent me, that I should lose nothing of all that he has given me, but raise it up on the last day” (John 6:39). Basically, that He should save them and keep them to all eternity. Well, the question now is: “Is Christ able to accomplish that which the Father wills for Him?”

To answer this question negatively is blasphemy. To entertain the thought that our Christ could in any way, shape or form disobey the will of the Father is not worthy of His glory. He laid down His prerogative as God and became like us, to obey the will of the Father and accomplish that work which was given to Him to do. That work, our Lord says, that He certainly accomplished (John 17:4). Furthermore, we have a clear word from the Savior as to the attitude of the Father towards Him. The Lord says:

John 11:42 I knew that you always hear me, but I said this on account of the people standing around, that they may believe that you sent me.”

Even those who knew Him knew that the Father will do whatever Christ asks (John 11:22). Christ on another occasion says that He “always do[es] the things that are pleasing to him [the Father]” (John 8:29). Well, it is the will of the Father that He give eternal life and kept for eternity all those who were given to Him (e.g. John 6:37-44; 17:1-5). Will the Lord ever fail to accomplish the will of the Father? Perish the thought! The Father always hears Him, because just like the Spirit, the Lord Christ—our faithful High Priest—intercedes according to God’s will (Rom. 8:27), therefore, His intercession can never fail. This is the firm foundation on which we stand.

Christ died and intercedes for the same group. Christ died that those for whom He died should be saved and by His intercession, He applies the benefits of His work to them in time. He never fails in His intercession. Since it is evident that not all men have faith or will be saved, therefore, Christ did not die in their stead, neither does He intercede for them.

Although I have added my own exegesis of the passages above, I have greatly benefited from Owen's insight into the connection between Christ sacrifice and His subsequent intercession. This is, in my opinion, a very powerful argument for Particular Atonement. Even if we take into consideration the work of the High Priest on behalf of Israel, for example, on the Day of Atonement (Lev. 16). It will quickly be replied by our opponents that the High Priest i...


1689 Baptist Confession Chapter 9: Of Free Will - Commentary

...

Necessity

  • All opposition of the Will is excluded in the very supposition of the case.
  • Necessity is simply the full and fixed connection between the things signified by the subject and predicate of a proposition.
    • General necessity is when all things considered there is a certainty for the existence of something or quality (or whatever) through the infallible connection between the subject and predicate of the proposition.
    • Particular necessity is when nothing that can be taken into consideration, in or about a person, thing, or time, alters the case at all in determining the Infallibility of the connection of the subject and predicate in the proposition which affirms the existence of the things. It is often something that is not connected with our will.
  • Moral Necessity is that necessity of connection and consequence, which arises from such moral causes, as the strength of inclination, or motives, and the connection which there is in many cases between these and such certain volitions and actions.
  • Natural Necessity is that necessity as men are under through the force of natural causes.

Inability

  • Natural Inability consists in being naturally unable to do a thing when we cannot do it if we will because what is most commonly called nature does not allow for it.
  • Moral Inability consists in either in the lack of inclination; or the strength of a contrary inclination; or the lack of sufficient motives in view, to induce and excite the act of the Will, or the strength of apparent motives to the contrary. Moral Inability consists in the opposition or lack of inclination.
  • General and Habitual Moral Inability is the inability in the heart to all exercises or acts of will of that kind, through a fixed and habitual inclination, or a habitual and stated defect, or lack of a certain kind of inclination.
  • Particular and Occasional Inability is the inability in the heart to a particular act, through the strength or defect of present motives, or of inducements presented to the view of the understanding, on this occasion.

The Confession

What the Confession says here is consistent with what Edwards said. It is God Who has given us this ability above the animals, which is contained in the fact that we are in the image of God. We are naturally free creatures. There is no necessity by nature (natural world) that we should be inclined to one way or another. By nature here is meant the natural world, physics, etc. not one’s own desires and human nature. One’s will is not forced, but it merely is the expression of one's own desires and inclination.


§2 In the State Of Innocence

  1. Man, in his state of innocency, had freedom and power to will and to do that which was good and well-pleasing to God, but yet was unstable, so that he might fall from it. 2
    1. Ecclesiastes 7:29
    2. Genesis 3:6

Adam, in his state of innocency, could really and truly will and...do that which was good and well-pleasing to God (Eccl. 7:29). He was not forced to do that which is good, but it simply flowed from his heart as yet unstained by sin. Yet his will was unstable. It was not fixed to righteousness but left unstable so that he might fall from it. The will of Adam and Eve is very unique and the only biblical data which could be used is in Genesis 1-3 and it does not say much on their will prior to the Fall. Therefore, the Confession is careful in saying what it asserts about Adam's will. We know that A...